Loft Insulation 

You could save around £175 per year

Check List:

  • Go into your loft and see if you have insulation on the floor. ·  Ideally you need at least 270mm of insulation depth, to meet the current standards.
  • Find out when your house was built
  • Check your doors and windows to detect drafts

Why insulate the loft?

British houses were mostly built early in the last century. We have some of the oldest properties in Europe. 

While well built, they did not feature many of the modern technologies used today to ensure heat isn't lost. Many of us live in homes which leak heat.

To make a comparison you would not be driving your car if it seeped petrol. By insulating the loft you can stop heat from leaking out of your roof.

How does having the home insulated save money?

Insulation helps trap heat within your home by not allowing it to escape.
This is why it is important to insulate your entire property not just your loft.
The main types are:

  • Loft insulation – The most common type is laid on the floor and looks fluffy.  Be careful though, as older insulation could be made from Glass Fibre and present an irritation  risk. It should be around 30cm thick. If you have none or not enough you should top it up.  Loft insulation acts in the same way as a woolly hat. A woolly hat stops heat from your body escaping through the top of your head. Likewise, the heat in your home will rise but loft insulation will help prevent it all escaping through your roof.. It costs up to around £300 to fit but can save you around £175 every year.

  • Wall insulation – there are two types depending on what kind of property you live in. Modern houses (built after 1950) have cavities between the external walls. These should be filled. It’s a simple and safe job that effectively injects insulation into your walls. It costs around £350 to do and can save you £135 per year. If your house is older it will probably only have one wall layer, called solid wall. This is particularly inefficient. This should be clad with insulation, either internally or externally. It is a big job, but modern insulation techniques mean the cladding is thinner than it used to be. The cost is upward of £10,000 but there could be some financial assistance in 2014 from Green Deal Home Improvement Fund . It can save you around £450 per year.  If you have a listed property, you will need to have Listed Building Consent in place, before you can alter your property.

  • Draught proofing – This is a simple technique that just fills in the various small gaps in your house that leaks air. This can be simple things like letter boxes to key holes. Unused chimneys or small holes in the floor are also a common problem.  It can cost £120 to have these holes filled in, but can save you around £55 per year. 

  • You can also have floor insulation to help block up the gaps in your timber floors. This can save around £60.

Where can I get insulation?

You can do some yourself, like loft insulation. But energy companies are currently obligated by the government to help you with the cost, so you should start by contacting your energy provider.  

More information:

http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/wales/Insulation/Roof-and-loft-insulation

http://www.uswitch.com/insulation/guides/how-to-insulate-a-loft/

http://www.which.co.uk/energy/creating-an-energy-saving-home/guides/how-to-buy-loft-insulation/ 

http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/utilities/free-cavity-loft-insulation


Loft Insulation

You could save around 720kg per year

Check List:

  • Go into your loft and see if you have insulation on the floor. Ideally you need at least  270mm of insulation depth, to meet the current standards
  • Find out when your house was built
  • Check your doors and windows to detect drafts

Why do I need to insulate the loft?

British houses were mostly built early in the last century. We have some of the oldest properties in Europe. 

While well built, they did not feature many of the modern technologies used today to ensure heat isn’t lost. 

Many of us live in homes which literally have holes in them leaking heat. To make a comparison you would not be driving your car if it seeped petrol.  

So how does insulation save carbon?


  • Insulation helps trap heat within your home by not allowing it to escape. Therefore it’s important to insulate your entire property not just your loft. 

    The main types are:

    • Loft insulation – The most common type is laid on the floor and looks fluffy.  Be careful though, as older insulation could be made from Glass Fibre and present an irritation  risk. It should be around 30cm thick. If you have none or not enough you should top it up.  Loft insulation acts in the same way as a woolly hat. A woolly hat stops heat from your body escaping through the top of your head. Likewise, the heat in your home will rise but loft insulation will help prevent it all escaping through your roof.  It costs a few hundred pounds  to fit (depending on the size of your property), but can save you around 720kg of carbon every year.
    • Wall insulation – there are two types depending on the type of house you live in. Modern houses (built after 1950) have cavities between the external walls. These should be filled with Cavity Wall Insulation. It’s a simple and safe job that effectively injects insulation into your walls. It costs around £350 to do and can save you 550kg of carbon per year. If your house is older it will probably only have one wall layer, called solid wall. This is particularly inefficient. This can be clad with insulation, either internally or externally. It is a big job, but modern insulation techniques mean the cladding is thinner than it used to be. The cost is upward of £10,000 but there should be some financial assistance in 2014 from the Green Deal Home Improvement Fund. It can save you around 2000kg of carbon per year.  If you live in a listed property, you will need to have Listed Building Consent before you can insulate.
    • Draught proofing – This is a simple technique that just fills in the various small gaps in your house that leaks air. This can be simple things like letter boxes to key holes. Unused chimneys or small holes in the floor are also a very common problem.
    • You can also have floor insulation to help block up the gaps in your timber floors. This can save around 240kg of carbon.


    If you want to have a zero carbon home or reduce your carbon emissions to a minimum you have to cut demand. Insulation is vital for achieving this. Other techniques can be used along side them, like using oversized windows facing the sun to radiate sunlight into the home. But all these need to be planned out properly to ensure there is no overheating or excess heat loss. 

Where do I get insulation from?

You can do some yourself, like loft insulation. But energy companies are currently obligated by the government to help you with the cost, so you should start by contacting your energy provider.  

More information:

http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/wales/Insulation/Roof-and-loft-insulation

http://www.uswitch.com/insulation/guides/how-to-insulate-a-loft/

http://www.which.co.uk/energy/creating-an-energy-saving-home/guides/how-to-buy-loft-insulation/ 

http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/utilities/free-cavity-loft-insulation